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not_nz_wikis:g_frankenstein_and_bycycles [2012/02/01 13:13]
art
not_nz_wikis:g_frankenstein_and_bycycles [2012/02/01 13:46]
art
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 ====== Frankenstein and Bycyles ====== ====== Frankenstein and Bycyles ======
 [{{ :​not_nz_wikis:​mary_shelley.jpg|Mary Shalley}}] [{{ :​not_nz_wikis:​mary_shelley.jpg|Mary Shalley}}]
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 As the price of oats soared to a new high, Karl Drais turned his mind to horseless transport Drais abandoned the idea and turned instead to improving surveying instruments. But the brutal weather following the eruption of Tambora sent the price of oats soaring to a new high. Horses were slaughtered for lack of food and Drais again turned his mind to horseless transport. This time he cut the number of wheels from four to two to reduce friction. As the price of oats soared to a new high, Karl Drais turned his mind to horseless transport Drais abandoned the idea and turned instead to improving surveying instruments. But the brutal weather following the eruption of Tambora sent the price of oats soaring to a new high. Horses were slaughtered for lack of food and Drais again turned his mind to horseless transport. This time he cut the number of wheels from four to two to reduce friction.
  
-[{{ :​not_nz_wikis:​karlvondrais.jpg |Karl Drais & Velocipede or Draisine}}]The resulting velocipede, or draisine, was the first vehicle to use the key principle of modern bicycle design: balance. "To modern eyes balancing on two wheels seems easy and obvious,"​ says Lessing. "But it wasn't at the time, in a society that normally only took its feet off the ground when riding horses or sitting in a carriage."​+[{{:​not_nz_wikis:​karlvondrais.jpg |Karl Drais & Velocipede or Draisine}}]The resulting velocipede, or draisine, was the first vehicle to use the key principle of modern bicycle design: balance. "To modern eyes balancing on two wheels seems easy and obvious,"​ says Lessing. "But it wasn't at the time, in a society that normally only took its feet off the ground when riding horses or sitting in a carriage."​
  
 Ice skaters, who balance on a blade, were the main exception to this rule. There are contemporary accounts of Dutch women skating from village to village along frozen canals, balancing a milk churn on their heads while doing their knitting. Drais had been a keen ice skater as a boy, so the idea of balancing on two wheels did not seem strange to him. Nevertheless,​ he decided to play safe. Instead of propelling the machine with a crank, riders simply scooted by pushing with their feet. "​People didn't dare to lift their feet off the ground for more than a second,"​ says Lessing. Ice skaters, who balance on a blade, were the main exception to this rule. There are contemporary accounts of Dutch women skating from village to village along frozen canals, balancing a milk churn on their heads while doing their knitting. Drais had been a keen ice skater as a boy, so the idea of balancing on two wheels did not seem strange to him. Nevertheless,​ he decided to play safe. Instead of propelling the machine with a crank, riders simply scooted by pushing with their feet. "​People didn't dare to lift their feet off the ground for more than a second,"​ says Lessing.
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 After his death, Drais'​s enemies systematically wiped his achievements from the historical record. Until recently, if Drais was remembered at all it was as a figure of ridicule. "​Ironically,​ the draisine is currently having a renaissance in Germany,"​ says Lessing, "as a toy to help children learn to balance."​ After his death, Drais'​s enemies systematically wiped his achievements from the historical record. Until recently, if Drais was remembered at all it was as a figure of ridicule. "​Ironically,​ the draisine is currently having a renaissance in Germany,"​ says Lessing, "as a toy to help children learn to balance."​
  
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not_nz_wikis/g_frankenstein_and_bycycles.txt · Last modified: 2012/02/01 13:46 by art
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