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not_nz_wikis:c_alice_in_wonderland [2012/02/01 13:40]
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not_nz_wikis:c_alice_in_wonderland [2012/02/01 13:41] (current)
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-What would Lewis Carroll'​s Alice'​s Adventures in Wonderland be without the Cheshire Cat, the trial, the Duchess'​s baby or the Mad Hatter'​s tea party? Look at the original story that the [{{:​not_nz_wikis:​lewiscarrollselfphoto.jpg| ​ Lewis Carroll}}] ​author told Alice Liddell and her two sisters one day during a boat trip near Oxford, though, and you'll find that these famous characters and scenes are missing from the text.+[{{:​not_nz_wikis:​lewiscarrollselfphoto.jpg| ​ Lewis Carroll}}]What would Lewis Carroll'​s Alice'​s Adventures in Wonderland be without the Cheshire Cat, the trial, the Duchess'​s baby or the Mad Hatter'​s tea party? Look at the original story that the  author told Alice Liddell and her two sisters one day during a boat trip near Oxford, though, and you'll find that these famous characters and scenes are missing from the text.
  
 As I embarked on my DPhil investigating Victorian literature, I wanted to know what inspired these later additions. The critical literature focused mainly on Freudian interpretations of the book as a wild descent into the dark world of the subconscious. There was no detailed analysis of the added scenes, but from the mass of literary papers, one stood out: in 1984 Helena Pycior of the University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee had linked the trial of the Knave of Hearts with a Victorian book on algebra. Given the author'​s day job, it was somewhat surprising to find few other reviews of his work from a mathematical perspective. Carroll was a pseudonym: his real name was Charles Dodgson, and he was a mathematician at Christ Church College, Oxford. As I embarked on my DPhil investigating Victorian literature, I wanted to know what inspired these later additions. The critical literature focused mainly on Freudian interpretations of the book as a wild descent into the dark world of the subconscious. There was no detailed analysis of the added scenes, but from the mass of literary papers, one stood out: in 1984 Helena Pycior of the University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee had linked the trial of the Knave of Hearts with a Victorian book on algebra. Given the author'​s day job, it was somewhat surprising to find few other reviews of his work from a mathematical perspective. Carroll was a pseudonym: his real name was Charles Dodgson, and he was a mathematician at Christ Church College, Oxford.
not_nz_wikis/c_alice_in_wonderland.txt · Last modified: 2012/02/01 13:41 by art
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