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living_in_new_zealand:walker_circulation [2011/07/07 16:56]
tel
living_in_new_zealand:walker_circulation [2011/08/26 07:44]
art
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 ====== Walker Circulation,​ El Nino and La Nina ====== ====== Walker Circulation,​ El Nino and La Nina ======
  
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 http://​www.windows2universe.org/​earth/​Atmosphere/​walker_circulation.html http://​www.windows2universe.org/​earth/​Atmosphere/​walker_circulation.html
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 +{{tag>​Weather Climate El_Nino La_Nina Walker_Circulation ENSO SOI}}
  
 ===== Gilbert Walker ===== ===== Gilbert Walker =====
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 Walkers contribution to our understanding of the weather was to apply the art of statistics long before the days of number crunching computers, what he had available was a large number of assistants in the Indian Met. Service. He set them the task of checking through weather and ocean data from around the world, and of statistically analyzing it and identifying any significant correlation between meteorological and oceanographic events. From this study there emerged a link between the monsoon'​s severity and the time of onset and the relative air pressures over the Indian and Pacific oceans. He found that high pressure over the Pacific tended to to mean low in the Indian Ocean all the way from Africa to Australia and vice versa. He immediately saw this as proof of the monsoon being linked to a global system, and he named this oscillation of pressure between the oceans the "​Souther Oscillation"​. Walker spent years building up date to establish that his oscillation correlated with the changes in rainfall and wind in the Pacific and Indian oceans, and with changes in temperature in Africa, southern Canada and the USA. Sadly his attempts to use it to predict the monsoon failed and his evidence of a link was called into question by other meteorologists. The problem was he simply did not have enough data to make the pattern clear, although years later it is now obvious that he was very much on the right track, and today the circulatory pattern that he identified has become known as the **Walker Circulation**. Its name is a tribute to his remarkable achievements,​ for what he did was far more then provide the first clues to predicting the monsoon, rather he set out the very foundations for our understanding of the global climate as a whole Walkers contribution to our understanding of the weather was to apply the art of statistics long before the days of number crunching computers, what he had available was a large number of assistants in the Indian Met. Service. He set them the task of checking through weather and ocean data from around the world, and of statistically analyzing it and identifying any significant correlation between meteorological and oceanographic events. From this study there emerged a link between the monsoon'​s severity and the time of onset and the relative air pressures over the Indian and Pacific oceans. He found that high pressure over the Pacific tended to to mean low in the Indian Ocean all the way from Africa to Australia and vice versa. He immediately saw this as proof of the monsoon being linked to a global system, and he named this oscillation of pressure between the oceans the "​Souther Oscillation"​. Walker spent years building up date to establish that his oscillation correlated with the changes in rainfall and wind in the Pacific and Indian oceans, and with changes in temperature in Africa, southern Canada and the USA. Sadly his attempts to use it to predict the monsoon failed and his evidence of a link was called into question by other meteorologists. The problem was he simply did not have enough data to make the pattern clear, although years later it is now obvious that he was very much on the right track, and today the circulatory pattern that he identified has become known as the **Walker Circulation**. Its name is a tribute to his remarkable achievements,​ for what he did was far more then provide the first clues to predicting the monsoon, rather he set out the very foundations for our understanding of the global climate as a whole
  
-As a consequence,​ Walker’s results fell into oblivion until Jacob Bjerknes, in 1960, expressed his interests in discovering the secrets behind El Niño. 
  
 Sir Gilbert Walker continued his studies of yearly weather and climate change after his retirement from India (in 1924) and acceptance of a professorship in meteorology at Imperial College London. He served as president of the Royal Meteorological Society from 1926 to 1927. Sir Gilbert Walker continued his studies of yearly weather and climate change after his retirement from India (in 1924) and acceptance of a professorship in meteorology at Imperial College London. He served as president of the Royal Meteorological Society from 1926 to 1927.
  
-He died at Coulsdon, Surrey on 4 November 1958. He was 90 years old.+Walker’s results fell into oblivion until Jacob Bjerknes, in 1960, expressed his interests in discovering the secrets behind El Niño. 
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 +Gilbert Walker ​died at Coulsdon, Surrey on 4 November 1958. He was 90 years old.
    
  
living_in_new_zealand/walker_circulation.txt · Last modified: 2011/08/26 07:44 by art
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